Carrot, Ginger & Turmeric Juice

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Carrots are super – they’re probably the vegetable that’s in season for the longest in Britain, growing naturally and happily in our soil from June right the way through to February. That’s a whopping 9 months, over three quarters of the year. You might think they almost don’t have a season, but it’s so good because whenever I crunch on one or press a bit of carrot through my juicer it’s a great feeling because I know they really are local and seasonal, a true English food.

They’re also pretty bloomin’ healthy as far as vegetables go. They’re great for vision because they’re rich in beta-carotene, which also helps slow down aging through acting as an antioxidant to cell damage. Moreover, carrots promote healthier skin through their vitamin A content, this wonderful vitamin helping to protect the skin from sun damage, premature wrinkling, dry skin and pigmentation. In addition to carrots, this juice is bursting with ginger and turmeric, which both add a lightly spicy tang that’s really stimulating. They’re both anti-inflammatory; ginger containing potent anti-inflammatory compounds called gingerols, which can be beneficial to chronic inflammatory diseases. Turmeric contains curcumin, which has powerful anti-inflammatory effects and is a very strong antioxidant.

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I woke up with a pretty bad headache on Christmas Eve so I decided to make a carrot juice with a ton of fresh ginger and turmeric, and you know what? It really worked! My headache didn’t disappear completely but it was 95% gone, which is an amazing result, especially as it all came from plants – no drugs, nothing synthetic, nothing artificial. Things like aspirin, paracetamol and ibuprofen are just so far from anything natural and when we swallow them our bodies have no idea what they are or how to process them. I’d so much rather sip on a juice, knowing that everything I’m putting into my body can only have a positive effect, in both the short term and long term. In simple words, this juice is an easy and great way to flood your system with vegetables, minerals and vitamins, giving it a good alkaline boost, so don’t hold back – especially if you have swollen glands, tonsils, sinuses or are generally feeling under the weather.

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Makes one large glass:

  • 2 large carrots
  • 1 apple
  • 1-2 inch piece of ginger (depending on how gingery you like it!)
  • 2 inch piece of turmeric root
  • Half a yellow bell pepper

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Simply press all the ingredients through your juicer, pour into a glass, give it a little stir and enjoy!

P.S. I like to save the pulp and make raw carrot cake

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Apple Purée, Cinnamon & Nut Granola

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Homemade granola trumps shop-bought granola in every single possible way. The taste, the crunch, the nuttiness. You can throw in whatever you like and it isn’t stuffed with refined sugar or synthetic honey or palm oil or preservatives such as sulphur dioxide. In the past when I took a bite of Tesco own granola or even brands such as Jordan’s or Dorset Cereals, I was always overwhelmed by how sugary it tasted. You can literally feel the granules of sugar melting on your tongue, going all over your teeth and straight down into your body. Which is really not good in any way.

I was trying to think up a new granola recipe with a seasonal element and my mind immediately jumped to apples, since they’re in season and full of their own subtle fruity sweetness. I love having stewed apple for pudding so I thought why not try baking it with oats and see what happens. The result is super and makes a delicious, fruity, crunchy yet squishy granola which I think you’re all going to love. It’s so easy to throw together (despite what looks like a long ingredient list!) and if you haven’t got the time to peel, core, chop and stew some apples then you can simply use apple sauce. And, even better, it’s probably one of the healthiest and most nutrient dense granolas out there.

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As well as oats (an excellent source of fibre and slow-burning energy) and apple, it’s brimming with pecans, almonds and walnuts, all of which give a great protein boost for first thing in the morning, as well as minerals such as iron and magnesium. On top of that, the pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds and flaxseeds not only enhance the protein content of the granola further but are a great source of the really good, healthy fats omega 3 and omega 6 which our bodies need and love. The cinnamon gives that yummy hint of spice which is the perfect partner for apple and the blackstrap molasses add a further fruity flavour and a little bit of extra sweetness. Blackstrap molasses is actually the by-product of the process of making refined sugar from the sugar cane plant and consequently contains all of the vitamins and minerals which white sugar lacks. It’s highly nutritious, containing healthy amounts of copper, iron, calcium and magnesium. It’s so great for vegetarians and vegans who often have trouble getting iron into their diet (I certainly do), but the combination of blackstrap with the nuts, seeds and currants makes this granola an iron-filled feast.

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Makes two large containers of granola:

  • 2 large cooking apples (or 3 medium sized) or 450g/1½ cups of apple sauce
  • ⅓ cup of water
  • 1 cup of rolled oats
  • 1 cup of jumbo oats
  • ½ cup of walnuts
  • ½ cup of pecans
  • ½ cup of almonds
  • ½ cup of pumpkin seeds
  • ½ cup of sunflower seeds
  • ⅓ cup of flaxseeds
  • ⅓ cup of flaked almonds
  • 3 teaspoons of cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon of mixed spice
  • 1 teaspoon of ground ginger
  • 3 tablespoons of coconut oil
  • 4 tablespoons of sunflower oil
  • 3 tablespoons of blackstrap molasses
  • ½ cup of currants or raisins
  • 2 tablespoons of yacon syrup/raw honey/maple syrup (optional – for sweeter tooths)

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Preheat your oven to 175°C. If making the apple purée from scratch, peel, core and slice the apples into small sized chunks and place in a fairly large saucepan along with the water. Put this on the hob at a medium heat, watching it until the water starts to boil. At this point put the lid on and reduce to a low heat to allow the apples to stew for about 15-20 minutes, checking them every five minutes and giving them a quick stir.

While the apples are cooking, place the oats in a large mixing bowl. Add half the walnuts to a pestle and mortar and give them a good bash until they’ve broken up into small pieces. Pour them into the mixing bowl with the oats before breaking up the other half in the pestle and mortar. Do the same to the pecans and whole almonds, and then add the flaked almonds and all the seeds to the mix. Give it a stir around and then add the cinnamon, mixed spice and ginger before stirring once more.

When the apple has stewed down into a purée, add your 3 tablespoons of coconut oil and blackstrap molasses so they melt nicely down into it too, giving it a stir so it’s all mixed well. Remove from the heat, allow to cool for a minute or two before pouring it into the granola mixture along with the 4 tablespoons of sunflower oil and the currants. Using a large spoon, stir the whole mixture up so all the oats, nuts and seeds are well and coated with the apple, oil and blackstrap (if you like your granola on the sweeter side add the yacon syrup, honey or maple syrup at this point too).

Line a large baking tray with a sheet of baking paper and then pour on the granola mix, spreading it evenly across and squashing down gently. Place this in the oven for about 45 minutes to an hour, depending on how brown and crispy you like it. Every 10 minutes or so take it out and give it a little stir to make sure it toasts evenly and none of it burns, and you get good sized nuggets of granola not one massive piece. When you’ve reached the desired crunchiness, remove from the oven, allow to cool and then store in an airtight container so it stays crispy and fresh for days, weeks or even months (depending on how fast you gobble it down) to come.

Blackberry, Walnut & Apple Crumble

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It’s been rainy and grey in England for the last couple of days, and so I thought it was time for some warming pud. Crumble is one of the best, and one we Brits can actually claim is ours – a bowl of crispy, crumbly topping over fruit with thick homemade custard is hard to beat. Blackberry and apple crumble is an autumn classic, and I can’t think of a more delicious thing to make with the abundance of brambles and apples which are both now in season. However, giving it a bit of a tweak, I’ve added walnuts, mixed spice and hazelnut oil to create a rich, piquant flavour.

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Brambles’ dark, inky colour means they have one of the highest antioxidant levels of all fruit. They’re also rich in fibre and contain a healthy dose of vitamin K, which benefits your bones by activating proteins needed to deposit new bone mineral tissue. This crumble tastes so great and you really won’t miss the butter and sugar content of the standard mix – trust me! Even better: it’s pretty good for you, from the anti-inflammatory benefits of coconut oil, to the ability of walnuts to help lower LDL cholesterol (‘bad’) and increase HDL cholesterol (‘good’) levels in the blood.

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Our apple tree is still being its nutty self, producing loads of apples, whilst also inexplicably deciding to sprout a blossom flower, at the end of August. Over the past week I’ve been out walking, picking basketfuls of blackberries from hedgerows and overgrown wild patches at the edge of fields, getting pricked and scratched in the process, but it’s so worth it. Blackberries are the easiest thing to forage, and they’re probably the most familiar to everyone’s eyes, so there’s no excuse not to get out there and harvest. If you start looking close enough they’re everywhere, always a treat to pop into your mouth as you pass by a bush. There’s something so calming, so satisfying about growing, gathering and picking your own food, and best of all you know exactly what it is and where it’s come from. There’s nothing better than that!

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Serves 4-6

For the crumble topping:

  • ⅔ cup of brown rice flour
  • ½ cup of porridge oats
  • ½ cup of jumbo oats
  • ½ cup of walnuts
  • ¼ cup of ground almonds
  • 2 teaspoons of mixed spice
  • 2 teaspoons of cinnamon
  • 1½ tablespoons of coconut oil
  • 3 tablespoons of hazelnut oil
  • 4 tablespoons of date syrup (or raw honey, maple syrup or agave nectar)

For the fruit:

  • 8 small apples (or 4 large cooking apples)
  • 1½ cups of blackberries
  • (Optional: 1 tablespoon of honey)

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Pre-heat your oven to 180°C. To make the crumble layer first crush the walnuts into little pieces in a pestle and mortar (or give them a whizz in a blender), then place them in a mixing bowl along with all of the dry ingredients and stir well. Next put the coconut oil, hazelnut oil and date syrup into a saucepan and gently heat until the coconut oil has melted and they have all combined. Mix this liquid into the dry ingredients, stirring to make little clumps of the oaty, crumbly mixture.

Peel and core the apples, chopping into 1 inch sized pieces. If using honey, mix the apple together with the blackberries and honey in a separate bowl before pouring into an ovenproof dish and spreading evenly. Sprinkle the crumble layer on top and then bake in the oven for 30 minutes, until the top goes golden brown. Stick a knife in to make sure the apple has softened (if not cook for a further 5-10 minutes), then serve and munch.

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Apple, Cucumber, Lime & Mint Juice (aka Healthy Mojito)

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Our apple tree has always been a bit of an unreliable, fickle thing. Some years it produces one apple, some years none, and then this year it goes and surprises us by sprouting loads of little green balls, and early in the season too. These apples are great for stewing or for apple crumble, but I just love them in a juice. They’re about the freshest thing I can get my hands on, with the tree just a few steps from our kitchen door, and when you drink this garden apple nectar and compare it to the fake, artificial, sugar-filled juice you find in the supermarket, you realise it is real juice.

The combination of apple with the other flavours is amazing. I used to love mojitos – the mixture of lime, mint and sugar is a real taste explosion in the mouth. So sweet, so zesty. But since giving up alcohol and refined sugar sipping on a cocktail isn’t something I like to do. However, this doesn’t matter in the least because this juice tastes like the real thing and, what’s more, is bursting with nutrients.

Juicing is so good for you because the vegetable and fruit liquid basically bypasses your digestive system, and the nutrients are absorbed straight into your cells. There are so many antioxidants and vitamins in just one glass of this juice, giving you an energy boost without overloading your body with too much sugar, thanks to the cucumber, broccoli and spinach. The mint (freshly picked from my garden) adds further nourishment and goodness to the juice through its ability to promote digestion, soothe and alleviate inflammation, cleanse the skin and stave off fatigue as a natural stimulant. All blended together, this really tastes divine and leaves you feeling invigorated and uplifted – so get juicing!

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Makes 1 large glass:

  • 2 medium-sized apples
  • 4 inch piece of cucumber
  • 1 green broccoli stem
  • A handful of spinach
  • Half a lime
  • A good handful of mint leaves

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Put all the ingredients into the juicer and flip the switch. Be sure to squash the spinach and mint leaves between the apples, cucumber or broccoli so they juice well and the flavours really come out. Pour the liquid into a glass with a couple of ice cubes and sip on a sunny afternoon!

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